Saltwater Crocodile

Saltwater Crocodile - Crocodylus Porosus

Saltwater Crocodile – Crocodylus Porosus

The saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) is also widely known by the common names, estuarine or Indo-Pacific crocodile, more rarely or informally referred to as the saltiemarineor sea-going crocodile.[2] This species is the largest of all living reptiles, as well as the largest terrestrial and riparian predator in the world. The males of this species can reach sizes up to 6.3 m (20.7 ft) and weigh up to 1,360 kg (3,000 lb).[3] However, an adult male saltwater crocodile is generally between 4.3 and 5.2 m (14 and 17 ft) in length and weighs 400 to 1,000 kg (880–2,200 lb), rarely growing larger.[4] Females are much smaller and often do not surpass 3 m (9.8 ft). As the name implies, this species of crocodile can live in salt water, but usually resides in mangrove swampsestuariesdeltas, lagoons, and lower stretches of rivers. They have the broadest distribution of any modern crocodile, ranging from the eastern coast of India, throughout most of Southeast Asia, stretching south to northern Australia, and historically ranging as far west as just beyond the eastern coast of Africa and as far east as waters off the coast of Japan.

The saltwater crocodile is a formidable and opportunistic hypercarnivorous “apex” ambush predator capable of taking almost any animal that enters its territory, including fish, crustaceans, reptiles, birds and mammals, including other predators. Due to their size and distribution, saltwater crocodiles are the most dangerous extant crocodilian to humans.

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